Tokyo Tower

This Tower is most likely one of the first landmarks you see when looking at pictures of Tokyo (東京). It is the famous Tokyo Tower, built after the popular Eiffel Tower in Paris.

With 333 meters in height, it beats the French tower by just 9 meters, making it the tallest self-supported steel tower in the world.

It was also the tallest structure in all of Japan (日本), until Tokyo Skytree was finished in 2012.

Tokyo Tower was completed back in 1958 and serves as a symbol of Japan’s post-war economic boom.

Besides its purpose as an observation spot, it is used as a broadcast antenna.

The tower has two observation decks, one at 150 and another one at 250 meters. So far, I have only been up to the 150 meter one and found that to be sufficient, but I’m sure the higher one has its thrills.

Visiting Tokyo Tower

On this deck there is a café and a souvenir shop where you can buy specific items like Tokyo Tower keychains or small replicas.

The 250 meters high top deck is Tokyo’s third highest observation deck, coming after the two decks of Tokyo Sky Tree.

Because of its central location, the view from Tokyo Tower is breathtaking. On clear days, you may get a chance to see Mt. Fuji (富士山) in the far distance.

The main deck at 150 meters is currently partly under construction. One of the four sides is closed because of this while the other 3 remain open. Construction is scheduled to end late 2019.

Beneath Tokyo Tower, you can find a building called “Foot Town” that houses shops, restaurants, cafes as well as the popular One Piece Tower. This one opened back in 2015 in celebration of the manga’s (漫画) 15th anniversary.

A variety of games and exhibitions can be enjoyed here.

Opening Hours & Admission Fee

  • 9:00 – 23:00 (last entry at 22:30)
  • There are no closing days throughout the year
  • 900 Yen (6,87€/$8.04) (just the 150 meters high main deck)

2,800 Yen (21€/$25) for both decks

One Piece Tower:

  • 10:00 – 22:00 (last entry at 21:00)
  • No closing days throughout the year
  • Admission Fee is 3,200 Yen (24€/$29), you can get a discount of 200 Yen (1,53€/$1.79) by buying a ticket through convenience stores (コンビニ) or travel agents

How to get to Tokyo Tower

Tokyo Tower is pretty close to Roppongi (六本木) so you can easily combine the two.

Take the Oedo Line from Roppongi Station heading towards Akabanebashi Station. After that, it’s about 10 minutes of walking.

The ride costs 180 Yen (1,38€/$1.64).

From Tokyo Station:

You can choose between two alternatives:
1. Take the JR Yamanote Line for 6 minutes and 160 Yen (1,12€/$1.43). Then, walk for about 15-20 minutes.

  1. Take the Marunouchi Line to Kasumigaseki Station. Transfer to the Hibiya Line and proceed to Kamiyacho Station. From there, it’s roughly 9 minutes of walking. Total time and cost: 24 minutes and 170 Yen (1,30€/$1.52).

Takeaway

Tokyo Tower is the slightly bigger version of the famous Eiffel Tower with some pretty red colors and illuminations.

It’s easily among the best things to visit in Tokyo, especially if you have not yet been on an observation deck.

Every one of the decks that are spread throughout the city offer great views, the main difference is the price really. The Metropolitan Government Building in Shinjuku (新宿) is very nice because it is totally free.

Tokyo Sky Tree is the newest and highest one of them all but comes with a price tag of around 3,000 Yen (23€/$27).

I find Tokyo Tower to be my favorite viewing spot in Tokyo because it is also a very romantic spot in the evening. Coming here together with your partner is promising! 😊

That’s all for this one, I hope you found it useful!

Thank you very much for reading, I appreciate it!

Stay tuned for my next post which will take us back to Kyoto (京都) to check out their amazing train station.

See you there!

Please share if you liked it! 🙂

Adventurous-Japan Author

Hi! I'm Daniel and I live in Germany. Passionate lover of everything Japanese. Thank you for reading!

View all post by Adventurous-Japan

Leave a Reply

avatar

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  Subscribe  
Notify of
shares
%d bloggers like this: